Just Not Ready To Be Dry

standard September 12, 2011 1 response

When I started this series of posts on bedwetting two months ago, I thought for sure that by the time it ended we’d have kissed our last GoodNites® goodbye and have moved on to a lifetime of dry nights.

I had faith that Little L would have mastered her bladder and her nights.
Instead it’s been just another lesson in the fact that we as parents don’t control quite as much as we think we do.
Our longest stretch of dry nights happened while we were in Chicago a few weeks ago. We made it six whole nights without a drop.
Since then? There hasn’t been a single dry night.
When I asked Little L this morning why she was wetting all her GoodNites® now, she quietly replied that it was because she “couldn’t think about it” while she was sleeping.
Wise words if I’ve ever heard of them.
In Chicago the kids were going to be later and waking up earlier. With shorter nights there was less time for peeing. Now that we’re home, we’re back to 12 hour nights, which are great for growth and mommy’s sanity, but not so great for bed wetting.
I’d try waking her up in the middle of the night to make her pee, but it’s taken us four years to get her to sleep through the night and I’m really not willing to open that can of worms again. She’s a creature of habit, if I get her used to waking up at midnight to pee, she’ll always be waking up and peeing at midnight. I’d rather just wait out her bladder maturity and let her sleep easy.
Two months ago I was convinced that with the right incentives, Little L could overcome her own nighttime incontinence. (Chocolate bribes are what got her sleeping through the night! Don’t knock it.) She was dry during the day and could demonstrate good bladder control all day long. It seemed to me that she was just being willful about the night stuff.
Now I know better.
Little L is one of the 6 million 4+ year-old kids in the US who aren’t physically mature enough to be dry at night. It’s who she is. It’s not a personality flaw. It’s not an attitude that needs adjusting. It’s who she is physically. Blond, blue-eyed, with a slightly immature bladder.
I hugged her after we talked this morning and told her it was no big deal. When her body is good and ready her GoodNites® will be dry. In the meantime we just won’t worry about it any more. 
This post is the last of a series of posts sponsored and inspired by GoodNites®. I hope you’ve learned as much as me about getting through the ups and downs of parenting preschoolers and nighttime accidents. For more help please check out the NiteLite™ Panel, hosted by GoodNites®, where professionals share invaluable information about bedwetting.

I am a GoodNites® Blogger Ambassador and I am being compensated for this series of posts, but, as always, the stories, thoughts, and opinions featured in these posts are mine and mine alone.

Almost Dry at Night

standard August 29, 2011 Leave a response
Last week I packed up the girls, our bathing suits, and a couple pairs of shorts for each of us and we headed across the country to spend the week with my sister in Chicago. Next to the shorts, t-shirts and other warm weather things in their suitcase, I tucked seven GoodNites®, one for each night we’d be there.
 
“If you wake up dry every morning we’re in Chicago, when we come home, we can give all the diapers that are still at home to a baby who needs them.”
 
Little L nodded emphatically, her determination written all over her face.
 
I wasn’t surprised. Three weeks ago Little L finally started showing some interest in trying to be dry at night. In the morning she wakes up and checks her own diaper. Her glee when it’s dry brings a smile to my face. The thought of finally being diaper free keeps it there.
 
Her first night in Chicago she woke up dry. It was her third day in a row.
 
“Only four more nights mommy!” She crowed, reminding me that even before our trip I’d been telling her that she just had to be dry seven nights for me to allow her to give up her diapers. Clearly she was determined to make that happen while we were at her cousins’ house.
 
Then it was five nights. Six… and then… on the seventh… she woke up wet. Really, really wet.
 
Ditto on the eighth.
 
I played it off as no big deal, because really it isn’t one. She’ll be dry at night when she’s good and ready. Bedwetting will soon be a thing of the past for us.
 
She played it off as no big deal, but I could tell she was upset. She had tried so hard to reach this goal. She’d been so proud every morning, counting off the nights for me. I pulled her into bed with me and cuddled her tight.
 
We talked for a moment about the day we were going to have and then I asked her quietly if she was upset. She simply nodded.
 
“You know I love you no matter what, right? You’ll get this. It’s going to be ok. Your body just isn’t quite ready just yet. It needs to get a bit bigger and a bit better at keeping the pipi inside, that’s all. We can try again tonight.”
 
She nodded again, then shrugged, burden lifted. Another minute of snuggling and she was struggling to get down, anxious to start her day.
 
She was dry again last night and I’m hopeful she’ll be dry again tomorrow, but I’m not deluding myself. It’s a process. For some it’s a short one, for others it takes longer. As long as she knows I’m never going to be mad about how long it takes I’ll be happy with how it goes.
 
This post is part of a series of posts sponsored and inspired by GoodNites®. Stay tuned as we share stories about bedwetting and discuss great products and tips to get you through the ups and downs of parenting preschoolers and nighttime accidents. In the meantime, check out the NiteLite™ Panel, hosted by GoodNites®, where professionals share more information about bedwetting.

I am a GoodNites® Blogger Ambassador and I am being compensated for this series of posts, but, as always, the stories, thoughts, and opinions featured in these posts are mine and mine alone.

Facing Big Issues with the Younger Set

standard August 16, 2011 2 responses

I remember holding my infant for the first time and gazing down at her sweet, trusting, innocent little face and wishing that she’d never, ever have to know bullying, sadness, or any of the horrors that the world contains. I wished for a moment that the worst she’d ever know would be a mild hunger twinge as I prepared her bottle or a slightly damp tush as I hurried to get a clean diaper.

And then I remembered a boyfriend’s mom who had been overly sheltered as a child and who was completely unable to handle all the world threw at her. I had felt nothing but pity for this woman who couldn’t even handle changing a light-bulb or buying an answering machine without requiring the assistance of her entire family. (You think I’m kidding don’t you?)

In my opinion offense being the best defense, I vowed to make my daughters strong and resourceful instead of overly sheltering them. While we don’t actively set them up in challenging situations, we also don’t rush to their rescue before coming to their aid, which is a much easier policy to uphold when dealing with putting on their own shoes or learning to wash their own hands than it is when facing really difficult issues.

As grown-ups we find it hard to see issues through a younger child’s lens, so when C came home complaining of a boy who was being mean to her, I instantly jumped to a “the big bully needs to be dealt with” mama bear stance.

I listened to my gut though, and before coaching her on tattling to the teacher, setting up a meeting with the parents, and alerting the media, I paused.

“Why do you think he might be acting this way in school?” I asked her.

Her response floored me. She thought back to when she feels mean, and wondered out loud if maybe he was hungry or tired at the end of the day.

And then she offered to bring him a snack.

It was a tiny incident that amounted to nothing, but it taught me a valuable lesson. When the “big” issues come up, we tend to want to deal with them with our big adult answers because we see them through our big adult eyes. Kids don’t always need the big answer, sometimes it pays to stop and see what level they’re at before answering.

So, the answer to ‘where do babies come from?” really can be “a mommy’s tummy.” And the answer to “why do I still have to wear GoodNites at night?” might just be “because your body isn’t ready to stop yet.” Issues don’t have to be broached in their entirety in one sitting. The really big topics need to be covered in tiny morsels, so that they don’t become a bigger deal than they need to be.

This post is part of a series of posts sponsored and inspired by GoodNites®. Stay tuned as we discuss great products and tips to get you through the ups and downs of parenting preschoolers and nighttime accidents. In the meantime, check out the NiteLite™ Panel, hosted  by GoodNites®, where professionals share more information about bedwetting.

I am a GoodNites® Blogger Ambassador and I am being compensated for this series of posts, but, as always, the stories, thoughts, and opinions featured in these posts are mine and mine alone.

Getting Through the Toddler Years – A huge ($250!) GoodNites Giveaway

standard July 27, 2011 182 responses

There are countless lists of things you need when you’re gearing up to survive your child’s infancy. Whole books have been devoted to this topic, and should you need a little extra help, there are also entire websites just waiting to help you figure out what you’ll need and why for every second of your baby’s first months.

By the time your kidlet figures out how to pull up and cruise his way around the furniture the people in charge of creating these lists most likely figure that you have a pretty solid handle on what your child likes or that you now have a solid network of friends who can help clue you in.

Of course, it never hurts to get a little extra help or a few more recommendations.

For instance, I was thrilled when a friend told me that I could just roll up a towel and slide it under the edge of the sheets to keep my preschooler from rolling out of her new big-girl bed instead of spending a ton of money on a bed rail. The roll makes her feel snug and safe while allowing her to slip out of bed to use the potty when she remembers she needs to go.

I was equally delighted to hear a mom friend talk about a genius little alarm clock that changes color when it’s time to get up. Since we set it up we no longer have to be serenaded with “Is it time to get up yet?” screams from 6am on.

The other GoodNites bloggers and I put our brains together and came up with a brilliant list of items that can make these potty training and betwetting years a little easier on hardworking parents. Even better, we’re all giving away a full set of these items to one lucky winner on each of our blogs.

No. Really.

So, check out this insane list of goodies and see below the one small thing you have to do to be entered to win!

GoodNites® Product Vouchers – So you can experience dry nights
A Skip Hop ZooPack BackPack – Who doesn’t need an adorable backpack?
A Foogo Drinking Cup – Heathly and always handy! 
Bob Book – For a little pre-bed reading!
Toothbrush and Hand Washing Timer – Can’t go to bed without clean hands and clean teeth!
Night Time Chore Cards – A smooth bedtime routine is key to getting a great night’s sleep.
KC Wipes – No need to explain this essential mom tool!
Bubbles – After a great night there’s plenty of energy for a lot of fun!
Crayons, Stickers – and a lot of creativity!
Movie Passes – For that first movie experience!
$100 Gift Card (AMEX) – To reward mom and dad for all their hard work!

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To enter please leave a comment below sharing your favorite bedtime ritual.

Extra entries:
– Tweet this giveaway using the #GoodNites hashtag (one per day- Leave a comment with the hyperlink to each giveaway.)
RSVP for the GoodNites® Twitter party. (See below for details)

Giveway will run from Wednesday, July 27th to Wednesday, August 3rd. Winner will be announced on Thursday, August 4th
 
Giveaway is now CLOSED. Thank you to all who entered!
The winner is… Jaime McHugh, #112! Congratulations!

This post is part of a series of posts sponsored and inspired by GoodNites®. Stay tuned as I introduce you to great products and tips to get you through the ups and downs of nighttime accidents. In the meantime, check out the NiteLite™ Panel, hosted  by GoodNites®, where professionals share more information about bedwetting.

I am a GoodNites® Blogger Ambassador and I am being compensated for this series of posts, but, as always, the stories, thoughts, and opinions featured in these posts are mine and mine alone.